Awarded to Wildsight Invermere to restore the damaged riparian and grassland ecosystems on the northeast side of Lake Enid and conserve them by protecting them from future damage.

PROPONENT: Wildsight Invermere

DESCRIPTION: The purpose of the Lake Enid Restoration and Conservation Project was to restore the damaged riparian and grassland ecosystems on the northeast side of Lake Enid and conserve them by protecting them from future damage.

OBJECTIVE:  The project involved a series of events whereby community volunteers participated in cleaning up litter and debris, removed invasive weeds, replanted native vegetation, rerouted trails to less sensitive areas, added to and maintained fencing, and posted “educational signs” to inform users of designated trails, fire pits and alternative routes. By rerouting motorized trail users away from the riparian areas, the goal was to reduce the risk that eroded soils, litter and petroleum fuels will enter Lake Enid, in order to improve the water quality of the lake — a benefit to all aquatic and terrestrial organisms that depend on it to survive.

In addition to this, interpretive signs were constructed along the walking trail to describe the history and cultural and ecological significance of the place.

This project stands as a tangible example that highlights the impacts of irresponsible recreation, as well as the possibility and benefits of restoration and conservation.

LEARN MORE: https://wildsight.ca/branches/invermere/lake-enid/

Heather Fischbuch, Robert Lawrence, Baiba Morrow, Eric Peter, Doug Charlton, Oliver Orchiston, Daniel Eastabrook, Tom Graves, Wade Lawrence, Bryan Ennis, Larry Stotts, Greg Amos, Alison Bell, Coleen Howitt, John Ashby, and Rob Orchiston complete Wildsight’s boardwalk-building bee at Lake Enid, Purcell Range near Wilmer, BC. Photo by Pat Morrow